Politzer House

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SITE OVERVIEW
It is one of the earliest buildings surviving the Great Flood of 1879. It was built between 1858 and 1859 by Salamon Politzer (1811, Szeged – 1877, Vienna) who was president of the local Jewish community several times. The house was built in Romantic style which builder is uncertain: some attribute it to the Lipovsky brothers, architects of the Old Synagogue; others consider it Károly Hoffers’s work (he also designed the Vajda House).
GENERAL
It is one of the earliest buildings surviving the Great Flood of 1879. It was built between 1858 and 1859 by Salamon Politzer (1811, Szeged – 1877, Vienna) who was president of the local Jewish community several times. The house was built in Romantic style which builder is uncertain: some attribute it to the Lipovsky brothers, architects of the Old Synagogue; others consider it Károly Hoffers’s work (he also designed the Vajda House). Politzer did not own the house for long, he moved to Vienna in 1870 where he spent 7 years as a goldsmith in the Emperor’s court. Some data state that he even received order from the Persian Shah. Salamon Plitzer’s wife, Eleonóra Bamberger had also Jewish decent; they were parents of 11 children. The house had a colourful history after its original owners left, for instance, Chief Rabbi Lipót Löw rented an apartment here until his death in 1875, advocates Soma Bak and Lajos Pollák opened their offices in the building; furthermore, Róza Gerner hat maker opened her saloon here. After the business closed down, a shoemaker started his business in its place, which functions as a café nowadays. According to original documents, a bar, named Red Mill once operated in the house which was later turned into a fast food restaurant named Tiszavirág Zónázó. The current 4 star boutique hotel and restaurant borrowed its name.
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