WJT

What Are We
All About

  • Our Mission
  • Our Story
  • Get Involved

Our Mission

World Jewish Travel (WJT) is a unique non-profit organization (501(c)) which provides an innovative and comprehensive digital platform to promote Jewish cultural travel and help users discover and experience Jewish heritage around the world.

Travel

Traveling is the best way to learn about a new culture and the history of a specific location. If you aren't quite sure where you want to go, read our travel blogs and eBooks to learn more about a city, and check out our cultural calendar to see what exciting events are happening around the world. These sources will help you get a better feel for each city and understand the history that transformed the city into what it is today.

Discover

Once you choose a destination, you can explore all the city has to offer. We make this easy for you by pointing out the top sites, and even local events that occur in that city. Whether you want to visit historical monuments, attend the annual Jewish music festival, or eat traditional food in the city's Jewish quarter, we will help you discover the best parts of the city.

Connect

During any journey to an unfamiliar part of the world, it is important to connect with the new culture and environment. We give you the tools to do that by providing top-recommended restaurants, tours, guides, and hotels - all of which will help you connect to and learn about the city's local culture.

Our Story

Our story starts with our founder Jack Gottlieb's trips to his mother's shtetl in Voronovo (Belarus) and his father's shtetl in Sarny (Ukraine). Each trip took 6-12 months to plan. This gave World Jewish Travel its kick-start.

2011
WJT was founded
WJT starts in Jack Gottlieb's living room with IDC students who wanted to  advance interest in their Jewish heritage. These students were part of the Hillel project, which provided students with work experience while strengthening their Jewish cultural roots.
2013
Israel's Top 100 Ethnic Restaurants eBook
WJT's first digital eBook is released. It explores 100 unique, well-known, and recommended ethnic restaurants throughout Israel.
2014
Instagram Campaign
WJT opens its first Instagram account (@wtj.restaurants), followed by @World.Jewish.Travel and @wtj.events to promote Jewish restaurants, events, and sites around the world.
2015
A Journey Through the Venetian Ghetto eBook
WJT's second eBook is released, taking a look at the history of Jews in Venice in the world's oldest ghetto. It shows the top Jewish sites, events, synagogues, restaurants, and tours in the Venetian ghetto.
2017
WJT eBook Library
An eBook collection offering both inspiration and practical guidance, while encouraging travelers to broaden and deepen their journey wherever their destination may be.
WJT Calendar
Includes both cultural days and cultural events taking place around the world
go to calendar
2020
WJT Website Launch
This website is a digital Jewish tourism platform where all WJT content is accessible and users can share their own content and services. The website launched in 2020 and includes an eBook library, events calendar, Jewish heritage sites and tours, cultural trails, tour guides around the world, kosher tours, and much much more.

Get Involved

We receive messages from writers, bloggers, city officials, and enthusiastic travellers from around the world. They want to know how they can contribute to World Jewish Travel. There are several way to help out (and we provide all of the tools you need). Here is how you can get involved:

WJT MEMBER BENEFITS

By becoming a member, you get ACCESS to all WJT content
Cultural Calendar
Calendar image Events & Days image
City Maps
Map image
eBook Library
eBooks image

RECEIVE OUR TRAVEL NEWSLATTER

WRITE A TRAVEL BLOG

Share your Jewish travel experiences with others by writing about favorite Jewish tours, events, restaurants, and hidden Jewish sites in cities around the world
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World Jewish Travel Official October 6, 2020

Top 10 ways to fix Jewish American Heritage Month

10 ways the month can become the best answer to the anti-Semitism epidemic sweeping the US May is American Heritage Month. Detail of Persin, Max. Farewell my dear parents Jewish folk song. Joseph P. Katz, New York, New York, 1920. (Library of Congress) May 1 marked the start of Jewish American Heritage Month (JAHM), a month dedicated to highlighting the significant achievements that Jewish contributors have made to American culture and history. Yet, as in years past, a few days before the official launch at the White House, it is still one of America’s best kept secrets! You hear very little about it in the Jewish media, even worse from Jewish organizations, Jewish museums, and Jewish educational institutions. That lapse of attention has not gone unnoticed in the past which is why every few years pundits write articles with such titles as “Why Does No One Care About Jewish Heritage Month?” This year, more than ever, American Jews should truly care. It is perhaps the best answer to the epidemic of hate and antisemitism that has recently swept the United States. Until now the variety of responses (condemnations, vigils, etc.) by the Jewish community to these threats has been reactive. These actions are strong, but there is another, more positive and proactive approach we could take, that is, making a concerted effort to celebrate JAHM. JAHM ceremony at the White House in 2012 (Source: Pete Souza / White House Archives) Why can JAHM be an effective answer? Since hatred stems from fear, and people fear what they don’t understand, cultural education is still the strongest antidote to hate. This is why Congress set up a governmental mechanism to commemorate the contribution of different ethnic heritages (Indian, Irish, Jewish, etc.) to the story of the United States. Typically, the government sponsors a government website dedicated to the month, an archive of virtual exhibitions, and a kick off ceremony at the White House. We just finished celebrating African-American Heritage Month in February and Irish-American Heritage Month in March. It is clear that such a dedicated time of education and cultural activity can teach citizens about a culture to which they might not normally be exposed. Thus, the JAHM in May is a golden opportunity to promote and highlight the achievements and contributions of Jewish Americans to the American narrative. Until now, unfortunately, the lack of promotion of the JAHM has rendered the event a severely underutilized asset. To go further, we need a stronger top-down approach to unify our work to honor the story of American Jews. Clockwise: Betty Friedan – a writer, activist, and a leading figure in the women’s movement in the United States (Source: Fred Palumbo / Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection); Dr. Gertrude B. Elion – Nobel Prize winner in Physiology and Medicine (Source: WikiMedia Commons); Estée Lauder – co-founder of world renowned company, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom (Source: Bill Sauro / Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram and the Sun); Joe Lieberman – US politician, and former Senator to Connecticut (Source: WikiMedia Commons). Fortunately, we do not need to reinvent the wheel. Every September, a European Jewish heritage organization (the AEPJ) celebrates Jewish Heritage week throughout Europe, and their incredible annual celebrations are truly the gold standard. In 2016, they logged about 126,000 visitors to 1,245 activities in 363 cities across Europe. We need only look towards our European brethren for inspiration and clear directive on how we can improve our efforts. It is important to note that a good percentage of the visitors were NON-JEWS! Here are 10 specific ways the US can step up to the plate this May, taken straight from the Old World’s playbook: 1. Plan far ahead: The European event is planned nearly a year in advance. As late as March 2017, the official website for the US May heritage month still reflected old 2016 events. We must be much more advanced in our thinking if we are going to have any kind of far-reaching impact. 2. Choose a meaningful theme in a timely fashion: only on March 6, 2017, barely two months in advance, did the current JAHM management make an announcement that this year’s theme is the contribution of American Jews to medicine. An announcement of this order 1 1/2 months before the launch of an event of this magnitude is too little too late. Curators need a good 6-12 months to research, organize and produce meaningful exhibits. 3. Appoint regional coordinators: Each observing region in Europe has it’s own coordinator (about 30 coordinators in total), and America should be no different. Such a coordinator would serve as a liaison between local municipalities and the national movement, as well as to foster cross-pollination and exposure within their own territory. 4. Create a strong, centralized website: The European website is clean, engaging, and, most of all, consistently updated. It provides easy access points for communities who’d like to get involved, clear avenues for assuming local or regional leadership, and a thorough detailing of events. Such accessible infrastructure is one of the first necessary steps to building a strong and enduring event cycle. 5. Expand the number of cultural heritage professionals in the national steering committee: A movement about cultural heritage simply cannot be effectively conceived or executed without the guidance of pertinent professionals representing diverse areas of the country. Europe has consistently elevated such professionals to leadership positions, and it shows in the heart and foresight behind its annual commemorations. America has no shortage of such professionals, and must make use of them to its best advantage. Synchronize global activities. (left: JAHM, right: AEPJ) 6. Produce annual outcome reports: Was 2016 a success? Was 2015? Does anyone know? How do we measure it? Unfortunately, the answer in the US is that we don’t measure it. The European effort includes annual evaluation reports of the successes and shortcomings of the year’s activities, including a variety of metrics and outcomes. It’s only by turning a critical eye on what we’ve accomplished and where we can improve that such improvement could be possible. 7. Invite Jewish organizations and corporation to be activestakeholders: The American Jewish community already has strong, wide-reaching infrastructure in place. Few localities are untouched by wider Jewish organizations. By inviting these umbrella organizations to be stakeholders in the event, many other pillars of the month will naturally fall into place. By not issuing this invitation, we also risk alienating those who could be our strongest leaders. Europe has demonstrated the importance and doability of uniting various Jewish communal arms for a concerted cause. 8. Institute a pay-to-play methodology for issuing high-profile invites: For some years (before substantial budgetary cuts), the White House held a special reception for Jewish American Heritage month. Recognizing and including those who put the sweat in (whether organizationally or financially) is an obvious and necessary way to encourage greater independent leadership in the movement. The more you “pay” into the production of the event, the more you should get to “play” at its culminating moments. 9. Synchronize global activities: Many thanks to Assumpcio Hostas de Rebes, an AEJP leader, for this suggestion. Why not have the American, Canadian, and European festivities occur at the same time, with the same theme? This would encourage cross-pollination of ideas, tourism, and create a camaraderie and united front among global Jewish communities. As Anshel Feiffer of Haaretz noted, this recent spate of anti-Semitism “could be a pivotal moment, not only for American Jews, but for the creation of a new global Jewish identity.” This is our chance to come together. 10. Remember forgotten heroes: Every culture highlights its deepest values and greatest achievements through memorials to its heroes, and Judaism is no exception. Curiously, however, Jewish American heroes are relatively unknown compared to those in Europe. Kudos to the Schusterman Foundation for pushing this idea. By the way, who is your Jewish American hero? What are your ideas for Jewish American Heritage Month? Let me know in the comments below or email your thoughts here. U.S. and Israeli flags. (Source: Maj Stephanie Addison / Wikimedia Commons) Let me make it clear: there is leadership in place to make this work, if the highest echelon can give a strong initial push. My organization, World Jewish Heritage is ready and eager to contribute to making JAHM a shining example of how promoting cultural heritage can mitigate hate. Identification of the contributions of members of different American populations, such as Irish, Italian, African-American and Jewish heroes, makes everyone understand that the United States was built on the backs of immigrants who represent a diverse palate of cultures and ideas. It also makes us understand that American cultural heritage is part and parcel of a bigger collective heritage. This message could not come at a more crucial time when anti-semitism is running rampant in our society, and we must decide to take the reins. The road to capturing the imagination of this generation and generations to come is to shine a light on the sterling examples of our past.

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World Jewish Travel Official September 25, 2020

City Story: Szeged

The map of Jewish world had been shaped in East Europe by the end of the 18th century and its main characteristics existed until the 20th century. The city of Szeged was placed on this virtual Jewish map when Mihály Pollack, the first Jewish trader, settled in the city in 1781. Jews as a group had been present in town from 1786 when they were allowed to settle by law. Early settlers were dominantly small-scale traders, artisans and peddlers; wealthy entrepreneurs have emerged gradually. The Jewish community in Szeged have been present since 1786; their religious life was led by their own rabbis from the very beginning, out of whom Chief Rabbi Lipót and Immánuel Löw were noteworthy persons, worth mentioning. Lipót Löw was the first Hungarian rabbi of Jewish reform movements; his son Immánuel led the Szeged community following his father’s footsteps between 1878 and 1944, the time of deportations. The Hungarian moderate reform movement, also known as Neolog movement, sprang from the efforts of reforming western Jews, the expectations of the state, and from the intention of Hungarian Jews to assimilate in 1868. Innovations of Neologism had no effect on the liturgical order, only the language use (Hungarian sermons and prayers) and the spatial arrangement of the synagogue changed. Nevertheless, the new movement brought changes in the dressing code, social behaviour and synagogue building. An independent Orthodox Jewish community existed beside the Neolog one between 1871 and 1888. The union of the two communities was restored in 1888 and from this time on the Orthodox community functioned as the Hebrew Beth Hamidrash Society in Szeged. The Society was supervised by the Jewish Community of Szeged while the Orthodox rabbi of Makó, Mózes Vorhand, was consulted in religious questions. The community had no independent synagogue, but operated a prayer house and a mikvah (at 6. Török Str.) from 1903 until 1941, after which they held their liturgies in one of the rooms of the Neolog community’s headquarter building (at 24 Gutenberg Str.). In the meantime, the Orthodox community decreased in number, counting only 30 members in 1943. Following deportation and forced labour, members of the community intended to re-establish their society in 1947, however their attempt failed. According to the last available data, 3 people declared themselves Orthodox Jews in 1950. The Jewish community was established in 1791 and they built their first synagogue at the location of the current New Synagogue between 1800 and 1803. The religious community opened its own primary school in 1844. Jews were allowed to settle in a given residential area embracing the current New Synagogue and its neighbouring streets in the early decades; however, they were allowed to buy a property anywhere in the city from 1859. There was a high demand for that since the number of Jewish population in the city rose to 2093 by 1855, which further expanded to 3628 by 1870 according to local census. 19th century has brought considerable changes in the social status of Jews in Hungary granting them equal political and legal rights similarly to members of other religious congregations. Emancipation created opportunities for numerous families to take part in shaping the economy, industry and the public affairs of the modernizing nation. Several outstanding Jewish persons appeared in the field of science, arts and literature; moreover, Szeged Jews played a pivotal role in rebuilding the city after the Great Flood of 1879. By the first decades of the 20th century the Jewish community counted 8000 members; however, their lives were broken by the Holocaust, altogether 8617 people were taken from the local ghetto. The community had 400 members in 2020.

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World Jewish Travel Official October 14, 2020

A Tale of Two Amsterdams

The same spirit that made Amsterdam a center of Jewish life centuries ago makes it a delightful destination today. There is one connection between the Netherlands’ “coffee shops,” where cannabis is sold legally, and the remarkable Jewish community that used to exist in Amsterdam — the relaxed attitude of openness that dominates this beautiful city. The historian Simon Schama portrays Amsterdam, where Jews first settled in the 16th century, as an exceptional case of tolerance in an otherwise-hostile Christian Europe. “There was no Amsterdam Ghetto, no yellow badge, horned-hat or lock-up curfew behind gates,” he wrote. Link to full blog by the Jewish Week: https://jewishweek.timesofisrael.com/a-tale-of-two-amsterdams/  

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GET CONNECTED

Connecting with WJT on social media is the best way to share your travel images, videos, and experience. If you visit a unique Jewish heritage site we want to know! So please tag us and share your travels with us whether you are dining at a local Jewish deli, attending a Jewish film festival, or visitng an old synagogue.

#WORLDJEWISHTRAVEL

Did you know that Jewish festivals, exhibits, culinary events, and holiday celebrations are taking place every month in cities around the world?

Our new account @world_jewish_events will help you stay up-to-date and find Jewish cultural events happening during your trip abroad and right in your hometown! 🎉
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A delightful skewer with grilled asparagus from the Local Italian restaurant in the Tel Aviv Port. This restaurant has undergone all sorts of changes, but is now flourishing under the command of Philx Rosenthal.

Come find a nice spot inside and enjoy a variety of unique Italian dishes!
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La Fabrica @lafabricapty is an excellent Israeli-Moroccan restaurant in Panama City where a guy named Itai prepares the food and a guy named Chai prepares the beer. According to food critic @gilhovavisrael these beers are some of the best he's had in his 56 years.

The photographed dish is the Mega Shakshuka, made with precision and high quality ingredients.

Next time you find yourself on a plane to Panama, this should definitely be on your restaurant list!
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Did you miss the Great Big Jewish Food Fest? Lucky for all of us, many of the sessions from this 10-day online festival were recorded and are avaliable for viewing.

Check out recipes, cultural food classes, and more with WJT's new vitual tours and events! 👨‍🍳

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking
#IsraeliFood, #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass
#IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef
#VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture, #JewishStyle
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Miss sharing Shabbat dinner with friends and family?

With WJT's new virtual events, you can find virtual Shabbat dinners to attend around the world!

This is a perfect way to make some new friends and connect with others on Friday nights. 🍷

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking
#IsraeliFood, #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass
#IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef
#VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture
#JewishStyle, #VirtualShabbat, #ShabbatDinner
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What traditional Jewish dishes have you been making this summer? 🧆

Experiment with new recipes and let WJT's new virtual cooking classes teach you to make tried and true Jewish-style dishes.

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking, #IsraeliFood #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture, #JewishStyle
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Always wanted to learn how to make traditional Israeli cuisine like Sabich and Malabi?

Get a taste of the Holy Land from the comfort of your home with virtual cooking classes by Israel's top chefs! 🥙

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking, #IsraeliFood #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture, #JewishStyle #Shakshuka, #Malabi, #Sabich
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Miss Shabbat dinner with family and friends?

Prepare unique Jewish recipes from Cheesy Garlic Challah to Sweet Noodle Kugel. You'll be sure to impress your friends and family at your next dinner party with these recipes. 🍽️

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking, #IsraeliFood #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture #JewishStyle, #ChallahRecipe, #Challah, #Kugel
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Come out of quaratine with a few new Jewish-style dishes under your belt!

Perfect your shakshuka or traditional bourekas with our new vitual cooking classes! Just buy the ingredients and let the food experts teach you the rest. 🍳🍅

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking, #IsraeliFood #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture #JewishStyle, #Bourekas, #StuffedCabbage
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Did you know that Jewish festivals, exhibits, culinary events, and holiday celebrations are taking place every month in cities around the world?

Our new account @world_jewish_events will help you stay up-to-date and find Jewish cultural events happening during your trip abroad and right in your hometown! 🎉
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See the hidden gems of Europe! 💎

With our new virtual tour, “Rediscovering Jewish Lviv,” disocover pre-war Lviv which was once the center of Jewish cultural, religious and political life 🇺🇦

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour, #VirtualTravel #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage, #JewishUkraine #JewishLviv, #TravelUkraine, #JewishHistory, #Lviv #Lithuaniatravel
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World Jewish Travel brings Jewish cultrual sites to you! 🕍

Take a virtual tour of the Great Synagogue of Vilna, which was built between 1630 and 1633 and for many years acted as the centre of spiritual and cultural life for Litvaks 🇱🇹

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour, #VirtualTravel #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage, #JewishLithuania #JewishVilna, #TravelLithuania, #JewishHistory #Vilna, #Lithuaniatravel
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Stuck at home? Travel with us virtually and explore the @juedischesmuseumffm

Discover the history of the first Jewish ghetto in Europe with digital exhibits and more!🇩🇪

Photo credit: Jewish Museum Frankfurt

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour
#VirtualTravel, #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage
#JewishGermany, #FrankfurtGermany, #JewishFrankfurt #TravelGermany, #JewishHistory, #Frankfurt
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Did you know that Majorca is the largest island in Spain's Balearic Islands? 🏝️

Check out our new virtual tour, “The Secret Jews of Majorca,” and learn about this island's fascinating history from the comfort of your home!

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour
#VirtualTravel, #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage
#JewishSpain, #HistoryofSpain, #JewishMajorca
#TravelSpain, #JewishHistory, #Majorca
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WJT brings Jewish culture to you! ✡️

Take a virtual tour and discover the house where Anne Frank lived in Merwedeplein, Amsterdam, just before going into hiding 🇳🇱

>>Link in bio

Photo credit: Franklin Heijnen / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)
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Experience Jewish Rome with World Jewish Travel's Virtual Tours 🇮🇹

Learn about the most ancient Jewish community in the Western World and its current small but vibrant community!

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour
#VirtualTravel, #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage
#JewishRome, #HistoryofRome, #JewishItaly
#TravelRome, #JewishHistory, #RomeItaly
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World Jewish Travel brings the Barcelona Haggadah exhibit to you with our new virtual tour!

This exhibit at the Barcelona History Museum tells the story of the highly active center for the production of Haggadot, manuscripts containing the ritual of the Passover Seder, used by families living in Barcelona's Jewish quarter and other Jewish communities 🇪🇸

>>Link in bio

Photo credit: Barcelona History Museum

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour
#VirtualTravel, #JewishBarcelona, #JewishCulture
#JewishHeritage, #JewishSpain, #Haggadah
#BarcelonaSpain, #TravelBarcelona, #JewishHistory
#HistoryofSpain, #TravelBarcelona
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World Jewish Travel presents virtual tours!

Take a tour of the Anne Frank Museum, Auschwitz-Birkenau or Jewish Rome. 🇪🇺 These tours are just a small piece of the European Jews' history, which spans a period of over two thousand years ✡️

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishTravel, #VirtualTour
#VirtualTravel, #JewishCulture, #JewishHeritage
#JewishRome, #AnneFrankHouse, #JewishAmsterdam #AuschwitzBirkenau, #JewishHistory, #AnneFrankMuseum #Poland, #TravelRome
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Discover virtual Jewish concerts and more with WJT!

You don't want to miss out on the International Sephardic Music Festival in Cordoba, Spain 🇪🇸🎶

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishMusic, #JewishConcert #JewishFestival, #KrakowJewishFestival, #IsraeliMusic #JewishCulture, #IsraeliChef, #VirtualConcert, #JewishEvents #JewishStyle, #JewishCordoba, #CordobaSpain
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Check out the Krakow @JewishFestival and more with WJT's virtual events!

Discover Jewish music and artists from Israel and around the world. 🎷

Photo repost: @JewishFestival

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishKrakow, #JewishMusic
#JewishConcert, #JewishFestival, #KrakowJewishFestival #IsraeliMusic, #JewishCulture, #IsraeliChef #VirtualConcert, #JewishEvents, #JewishStyle
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Did you miss the Great Big Jewish Food Fest?

Lucky for all of us, many of the sessions from this 10-day online festival were recorded and are avaliable for viewing.

Check out recipes, cultural food classes, and more with WJT's new vitual tours and events! 👨‍🍳

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking, #IsraeliFood #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture #JewishStyle
...

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Miss sharing Shabbat dinner with friends and family?

Find virtual Shabbat dinners to attend around the world with WJT's new virtual events!

This is a perfect way to make some new friends and connect with others on Friday nights. 🍷

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking
#IsraeliFood, #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass, #IsraeliCuisine #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef, #VirtualTours, #JewishEvents #JewishCulture, #JewishStyle, #VirtualShabbat, #ShabbatDinner
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World Jewish Travel brings Israeli cuisine to you! 🥙

Learn how to make traditional Israeli dishes with online classes and culinary events taught by master Israeli chefs! 👩‍🍳

>>Link in bio

#WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFood, #JewishCooking
#IsraeliFood, #Israeli_Kitchen, #CookingClass
#IsraeliCuisine, #Israeli_Food, #IsraeliChef
#VirtualTours, #JewishEvents, #JewishCulture
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Let us help you stay connected to the global Jewish community and find Jewish seminar and learning sessions. 🌎

Connect with organizations like @Limmud where you can attend Jewish learning sessions on a variety of topics of national and global interest.

Photo repost: @limmud

>>Link in bio

#JewishLearning, #JewishCommunity, #JewishEvents #Limmud, #WorldJewishTravel, #Talmud, #JewishLife
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Find Jewish festivals and culinary events around the world with our new virtual events!

Check out the San Fransisco Jewish Film Festival to find documentaries, producer interviews, and Cinegogue Sessions! 🎬

>>Link in bio

#JewishLearning, #JewishEvents, #VirtualEvents, #SanFrancisco #WorldJewishTravel, #JewishFestival, #JewishLife
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WJT brings Jewish learning to you!

Your favorite Jewish events might have been cancelled, but there are plenty of virtual ones to attend! 👩‍💻

Join a weekly Torah study group, learn about the Hebrew language, or take a class on Jewish history ✡️

>>Link in bio

#JewishLearning, #JewishEvents, #VirtualEvents
#JewishFilmFestival, #JewishHistory, #WorldJewishTravel #Talmud, #LearnHebrew, #JewishLife
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We're here to help you find the best spots in the Holy Land with our new account @world_jewish_travel_israel 🇮🇱

This account is dedicated entirely to Israel travel from the top of the Hermon to the Dead Sea
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