Chief Rabbi Lipót Löw’s Grave

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Holy Grave
SITE OVERVIEW
Lipót Löw (1811–1875), originating from Moravia, was a famous Chief Rabbi of Szeged where he served in his position from 1850 until his death. He was the first representative of the Hungarian moderate reformed (Neolog) movement. He highly contributed to the creation of Jewish Emancipation Law of 1867 and is one of the most influential Neolog rabbis in Hungary. Grave location: Parcel 10, line 1, grave 3
GENERAL
Lipót Löw (1811–1875), originating from Moravia, was a famous Chief Rabbi of Szeged where he served in his position from 1850 until his death. He was the first representative of the Hungarian moderate reformed (Neolog) movement. He highly contributed to the creation of Jewish Emancipation Law of 1867. Löw was an outstanding scholar as well, experienced in religious law, Judaism and archaeology. He had been widely respected until his death; both Emperor Franz Joseph and the Hungarian government often consulted Löw in religious issues. He was a father of 14 children (7-7 children were born from two wives Leontin Schwab és Babett Redlich), several of them had outstanding careers during their lives. His best-known child was the world-famous scholar Chief Rabbi Immánuel Löw (1854–1944). Lipót Löw’s grave is located in parcel No 10 amongst other community leaders, academics and leading personalities of the Jewish community. The sarcophagus-shaped tombstone sits on an elevated platform. Above the grave two pediments and six Greek-style columns support the roof structure. The epitaph on the tomb is engraved in both Hungarian and Hebrew. The whole city represented itself at Lipót Löw’s funeral; furthermore, national and international guests also attended his burial ceremony. Löw was buried as a privileged person: he was laid in three coffins. From the memoires of Mózes Joachim Schäffer, the cemetery’s designer, we know that the chief rabbi chose the place for his own burial site. When they once visited the cemetery together, Löw asked where Jozef Klein’s grave was. Jozef Klein was the teacher of Lipót Löw’ s children and the community’s registrar. When Lipót Löw was shown the grave, he asked Klein to place all Talmud teachers in that row including himself. He asked not to place a grave in-between his and Jozef Klein’s. After his death, his wish was fulfilled. One of the first condolences to the Löw family was sent by Louis Kossuth from Turin, Italy.
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