Herzl House

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SITE OVERVIEW
The Herzl House is one of the few buildings that survived the Great Flood of 1879; according to remaining documents, Fülöp Herzl had it built between 1868 and 1872. The architect of the Classical style house is unknown.
GENERAL
The Herzl House is one of the few buildings that survived the Great Flood of 1879; according to remaining documents, Fülöp Herzl had it built between 1868 and 1872. The architect of the Classical style house is unknown. The building originally housed apartments, offices and workshops; moreover, its owner had lived here until he moved to the capital. Pál Goldsetin’s famous kosher bar (Gólyához) selling excellent spirits and Hungarian-style dishes, ran here as well as other businesses such as Lipót Várnai’s bookshop (1877), a paint shop, (Várnay, 1880–1927), Pál Nagy’s painting workshop (1911–1920), a photo studio (1913−1937); Erzsébet Malivanek’s women’s tailor shop (1933–1947). János Braun, a well-known master of musical instrument maker, also rented a shop here between 1911 and 1922. The building’s ownership was handed over to the local parish of the Hungarian Reformed Church in 1926 on condition they make a dormitory for Reformed college students since a large number of Protestants moved from Transylvania after the Treaty of Trianon. This college formed the Gábor Bethlen Circle, which aimed at supporting poor students as well as deepening their religious and patriotic feelings. Later on, the Circle formed the Young Artist’s College of Szeged, which organized photographer Judit Kárász and graphic artist György Buday’s first exhibition in the city. The Reformed Church currently owns the building.
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