Menorah

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SITE OVERVIEW
The four-meter-tall menorah was erected on 14 September 2014 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the deportation of Jews from Szeged and its surrounding areas. The first Jewish ghetto was created around the synagogue and was bordered by Bolyai, Jósika, Hajnóczy and Gutenberg Streets and Bartók Square. The menorah can be found in the yard of the New Synagogue.
GENERAL
The four-meter-tall menorah was erected on 14 September 2014 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the deportation of Jews from Szeged and its surrounding areas. The first Jewish ghetto was created around the synagogue and was bordered by Bolyai, Jósika, Hajnóczy and Gutenberg Streets and Bartók Square. Wooden fences with a single entrance surrounded the ghetto space, where nearly 4000 people were crowded; the glass sheets of the outer windows of those houses that were located on the edge had to be painted white. Some of the people had to wait deportation in labelled apartments. Jewish people were summoned and marched over to the empty spaces, guarded by armed soldiers, behind the brick- and canned food factories on 15 June 1944. They were joined by over another 4000 Jews taken from the surrounding areas. Altogether 8617 people were deported from this camp in three trains on 25, 27 and 28 June. Passengers of the first train were directly taken to Auswitz. Some of the passengers of the second train and the third one were directed to Strasshof, Austria where Jews were forced to do fieldwork. Almost 1500 deported returned to Szeged after the war. Sculptor András Lapis’ menora-shaped monument and its following inscriptions on the seven arches commemorate these events: “They were killed by hatred; their memories are kept by love.” The menorah, being one of the most important symbols of the Jewry, was an essential accessory of the sanctuary of Jerusalem.
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