Wagner Palace

trip advisors rating
Attractions
SITE OVERVIEW
One of the highlights of the famous main pedestrian street of Szeged is the modest Art Nouveau building of Wagner Palace at the corner of Kölcsey Street. The palace was built between 1904 and 1905 according to the design of Budapest-based Jewish architect Lipót Baumhorn. This palace is home to one of the richest citizens in Szeged
GENERAL
One of the highlights of the famous main pedestrian street of Szeged is the modest Art Nouveau building of Wagner Palace at the corner of Kölcsey Street. The palace was built between 1904 and 1905 according to the design of Budapest-based Jewish architect Lipót Baumhorn. Its builder, Gusztáv Wagner (1857−1932) was one of the wealthiest Szeged citizens of his time. He continued his father’s textile business; moreover, he was president of the Szeged Commercial and Industrial Bank. Wagner was an influential socialite; he was member of several local boards, including that of the Szeged Casino. He was also a racer of the Szeged Boat Club. The imposing early 19th century palace well reflects its owner’s wealth and business skills. The building was built for wealthy tenants and business owners. On the ground floor, according to the contemporary press, "there are fancy shops that not only enhance the variety of evening life, but also lend character to the downtown area’s main artery and promenade." Twelve shops operated on the street front, while storage rooms and the housekeeper’s apartment faced the inner courtyard. Apartments, each having 5 rooms, were located upstairs and could be accessed from the inner corridors through two staircases. The utility room, the tenants’ and further storage spaces were found in the basement. Wagner had several other palaces built for investment purposes; further two were also built by Lipót Baumhorn: the Kölcsey Court at 30. Feketesas Street and Wagner Rental Palace at 28 Feketesas Street.
@endphp