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JEWISH Tel Aviv

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Tel Aviv is the most populous city in the Gush Dan metropolitan area of Israel. Located on the Israeli Mediterranean coastline with a population of 460,613, it is the economic and technological center of the country. Considering East Jerusalem as part of Israel, Tel Aviv is the country's second-most populous city after Jerusalem; if not, the most populous city before West Jerusalem. Tel Aviv is governed by the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality, headed by Mayor Ron Huldai, and is home to many foreign embassies. It is a beta+ world city and is ranked 25th in the Global Financial Centres Index. Despite its size, it contains the third or fourth-largest economy and the largest economy per capita in the Middle East, but has the 31st highest cost of living in the world. Tel Aviv receives over 2.5 million international visitors annually. The city was founded in 1909 by the Yishuv (Jewish residents). It was perceived to be a modern housing estate on the outskirts of the ancient port city of Jaffa, and was considered to be part of the Mutasarrifate of Jerusalem within the Ottoman Empire. It was initially called 'Ahuzat Bayit' (lit. "House Estate" or "Homestead"), the name of the association that established the neighborhood. The following year, the name changed to 'Tel Aviv', after the biblical name 'Tel Abib' was adopted by Nahum Sokolow. This was the title for his Hebrew translation of Theodor Herzl's 1902 novel Altneuland ("Old New Land"). Additional Jewish suburbs of Jaffa that were established before Tel Aviv eventually became part of the city, the oldest among them being Neve Tzedek, which was established in 1886. Tel Aviv was given "township" status within the Jaffa Municipality in 1921, and became independent from Jaffa in 1934. After the 1947–1949 Palestine War, Tel Aviv began the municipal annexation from parts of Jaffa. Eventually, it became fully unified with Jaffa under the name "Tel Aviv" in April 1950. It was then renamed to the Tel Aviv as we know it today being "Tel Aviv-Yafo" in August 1950. Jewish refugee immigration to Israel was so immense that the growth of Tel Aviv soon outpaced that of Jaffa, which had a majority Arab population. Tel Aviv and Jaffa were later merged into a single municipality, two years after the 1948 Israeli Declaration of Independence. To learn more about this historic day, make sure you stop by Independence Hall. Tel Aviv's White City, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, comprises the world's largest concentration of international style buildings, including Bauhaus and other related modernist architectural styles. There is even a Bauhaus Center dedicated to showcasing the functional yet pristine design movement throughout Tel Aviv. Additional must-see sites include the Tel Aviv Art Museum, which is home to a notable collection of local and international art, Rabin Square, Israel’s most famous plaza dedicated to Yitzhak Rabin, Israel’s Prime Minister who was assassinated after a pro-peace rally, and of course, the infamous Tel Aviv beach promenade. If you're visiting Israel during the summer and looking to escape the heat and learn more about this city's history, Tel Aviv is filled with amazing museums like the Eretz Israel Museum, the Palmach Museum, and the Museum of the Jewish People; and conveniently, these museums are  located close to one another. There is no shortage of famous and renowned people who have strong roots in Tel Aviv. One of the most notable and revered is Meir Dizengoff, the first Mayor of Tel Aviv. He is known and respected as someone who had such clear visions and hope for the future of this city. People trusted that he would succeed in making his visions come to come to life and he constantly did. Dizengoff was active in the Hibbat Zion Movement and later formed a Jewish workers' organization. He participated in Zionist Congresses and was a founder of the Gulah Company, formed in 1904 to purchase land in Israel. He additionally founded The Ahuzat Bayit Company, organized to establish a modern Jewish quarter near the Arab city of Jaffa in 1909. When Tel Aviv officially became a city in 1921, Dizengoff was elected as its first mayor and served until the end of his life in 1937. Upon the outbreak of the 1936 Arab riots, Dizengoff urged that the government offices be opened in Tel Aviv and succeeded in establishing a separate port at Tel Aviv, independent of Jaffa and its port. Dizengoff was one of the major initiators and dedicated supporters of culture in Israel. A highly spiritual, yet social individual he encouraged cultural life in all its variations. To this day, Tel Aviv has followed Dizengoff's life interests and has become the center of a bustling and vibrant life. Chaim Topol is a Tel Aviv born Israeli actor who is best known for playing the character of ‘Tevye’, a dairyman, in the musical comedy-drama ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ on stage and screens in his career. He is a man of many talents - not only is he a great actor but also a singer, producer, comedian, voice artist, and illustrator. As an Israeli, he has achieved many features in the international stage of the show business, including being the first-ever Israeli to be nominated for the Academy Awards.

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SITES TO SEE

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Dizengoff Fountain

The "Fire and Water Fountain", commonly referred to as "Dizengoff Square Fountain", is a Tel Avivian landmark in the center of Dizengoff Square. Dedicated in 1986, the fountain is a kinetic sculpture and the work of the Israeli artist, Yaacov Agam. Agam developed this fountain over a period of ten years and it is one of his most renowned creations. He has gained international recognition as one of the founders of the kinetic art movement. The fountain consists of an illusory and a movement dimension. These are both typically works of Kinetic and Op art, which is achieved by the use of technology and the observer's movement. The fountain is composed of several big jagged wheels, which were designed in the kinetic style (colored geometric shapes, which are perceived as different images from different angles). A technological mechanism is automatically activated at different times of the day and the night, turning the wheels on their hinges, injecting water upwards in various forms, spitting fire upwards, while playing music. Throughout the years the fountain drew a lot of criticism from the Tel Aviv residents for the high cost of its ongoing maintenance. Until recently, the fountain was poorly maintained and occasionally stopped operating. However, the fountain was recently repainted and is a large social landmark known by all Tel Avivians. Photo Attributions: Ted Eytan, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons Ori lubin, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons Rubinstein Felix,, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

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TOURS OF Tel Aviv

Tours

Shuk and Cook

Join me on a culinary adventure in Tel Aviv’s historic neighbourhood of Florentine or the Yemenite Quarter. We will visit Levinsky or Carmel Market and learn about their history and evolution. You will be introduced to shop owners and their heritage and taste traditional dishes. You will be shown the unique ingredients that make up the diverse cuisine found in Israel. The adventure will continue in my kitchen with a workshop on signature dishes found in Israel using ingredients from the market. We will conclude with a feast of flavours and cocktails Please watch promo: https://youtu.be/MpaVWOIYG6o Tasting treats from the market Gazoz – A refreshing reinterpretation of a soda (cool drink) using seasonal ingredients, fresh herb and bubbles. Anti-pasta platter from a Turkish deli including signature olives Burekas – stuffed phyllo pastry in a Turkish style Churchkhela- a Georgian sweet of nuts encased in grape jelly. Halva – a sesame based confectionary found in the middle east and the Mediterranean amongst others in different varieties. Cooking workshop Starters Baba ganush with green tahini (flame smoked eggplant with a sesame dip sauce blended with lots of parsley) Almond labane with zaatar and pomegranate    (zesty nut cheese with a special herb and sesame seasoning) Freekeh (smoked green wheat) salad with dried figs, pistachios, parsley, mint and sumac dressing Mains Kebabs on cinnamon sticks Mejadara ( a Levantine dish of rice and brown lentils with mounds of caramelised onions) Dessert Malabi in two flavours – classic rose with pistachio and halva with silan and salted almonds Also includes: - Cocktails: arak with grapefruit, mint and cucumber - Local wine with meal - Recipe booklet and spices to take home - Menu and tastings may vary according to season Hours: Mondays-Thursdays 10: 30 -14:30 or 15:30 – 19:30 Fridays 9:30 – 13:30

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World Jewish Travel Official July 31, 2022

Welcoming Purim 2022: A Jewish Carnival of Hamantaschen, Parades, and Plenty of Alcohol

Purim 2022: The Purim Holiday is Back and Better Than Ever From Europe to the Middle East, Jews have been subjected to some of the most ruthless minority treatment in history. There have been many moments where Jewish communities around the world have thought, "This is the end." However, most of the time it all works out and as a result, a new holiday is born. One choice joke that American Jews often like to employ during such holidays is, "They tried to kill us, they failed, let’s eat." On Purim, this sentence is altered to read, "They tried to kill us, they failed, let’s party." For the last two years, the pandemic canceled this opportunity. However, Purim 2022 is returning with vengeance and several major events in Israel. Grab your Purim costume and your alcohol of choice and take to the streets and bakeries for all the merriment. [caption id="attachment_33622" align="alignnone" width="590"] Plate of traditional Hamantaschen cookies[/caption] Hamantaschen: A Tasty Symbol of Jewish Victory Sure, there are plenty of parades and things to do in Tel Aviv during the Purim holiday. Yet before all that you need to set a good carb base for all the alcohol you will surely consume. There is no better pre-drinking snack than some classic hamantaschen. These triangle shaped treats are sculpted to look like the three pointed hat of the famous Jewish enemy Haman. Haman wanted all the Jews of Persia massacred. It was through the efforts of Queen Esther, that the Jews of Persia were saved. She convinced King Ahasuerus to spare her people and execute Haman in the place of her Uncle Mordecai. For this reason, on Purim Jews read the Megillat Esther and indulge in some delicious little Haman hats or hamantaschen. Some of the best hamantaschen to be found in Tel Aviv is at Puni or Lechamin Bakery.  Puni, the first cake shop in Yaffo, was built by a Polish immigrant by the name of Avi Puni, who came to Israel in 1922. The bakery specializes in many assortments of sweet and savory baked goods. All of these tasty treats are made using recipes straight from the Puni family cookbook. Throughout the year they are known for their signature bourekas and marzipan but during the Purim holiday, the hamantaschen reign supreme. Lechamin Bakery is known for its shelves of freshly baked and delicious loaves of bread from sourdough to rye. Exiting Lechamin without an assortment of fresh baked goods is next to impossible. This Purim 2022, indulge in their classic chocolate hamantaschen and pair it with a cup of their delicious coffee. [caption id="attachment_33531" align="alignnone" width="678"] Participants of the Zombie-Walk Tel Aviv dressed in a zombie Purim costume[/caption] The Walking Dead: Purim 2022 Edition Purim costumes come in all shapes, sizes, and colors, however, for certain occasions a dress code is required. Start prepping some fake blood and your finest ripped shirts for the Zombie Walk on March 19th. This is one of the most beloved themed Purim parades in all of Israel. People from far and wide come to Tel Aviv to take part in this celebration of the dead. In earlier years, the number of walkers was in the thousands. This year, volunteers are hoping for a similar turnout. The parade kicks off at 9:30pm at the corner of King George and Sderot Ben Tzion. Everyone is welcome, the young, the old, and do not be afraid to take your costume to another level of terrifying.  [caption id="attachment_33625" align="alignnone" width="614"] Parade participants dressed in Purim costume[/caption] Adloyada is Aramaic for Stinking Drunk  The Adloyada parades are by far the most celebrated events in Israel for the Purim holiday as well as the most historic. The first parade took place in Tel Aviv in 1912 and from that point on have been a staple of the Purim holiday in Israel. The Amaraic phrase that gave birth to the name Adloyada is “Ad Delo Yada'' roughly translated as “until no one longer knows.” Traditionally you must get so drunk on Purim that you can no longer tell the difference between the names Haman and Mordecai. These names look completely different in the Megillah so you have got to be pretty wasted.  The Adloyada parades not only consist of people but some fairly elaborate floats. In the past, these floats paid homage to the history and culture of Israel. Some designs included giant Ben Gurion heads reading Israel’s declaration of independence or the twelve tribes of Israel. Today, the floats reflect a more modern touch of Israeli culture. The criteria are outlandish, colorful, and loud. DJs and musicians from across the nation come to spin their records and blast their horns from atop the floats. The overarching theme is diversity and difference, which can be seen in each and every float and every Purim costume.  [caption id="attachment_33137" align="alignnone" width="518"] Purim Items: Hamantaschen (Oznei Haman), Purim masks, and Gragger (traditional noise maker)[/caption] Purim: A Much Needed Celebration of Life  This Purim 2022 is possibly the most needed holiday in the last few years for the Jewish people and Israel. After all the stress, isolation, and precautions, it is high time that the entire nation let its hair down. Celebrating the continuation of life is a key pillar of many Jewish holidays, including Purim. This upcoming Purim holiday will be a celebration of survival not only for the Jews of ancient Persia but also Jews of the modern age.

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World Jewish Travel Official August 3, 2022

Virtual Hanukkah Celebrations

From dreidels to latkes and everything in between, Hanukkah has become a holiday filled with joy and celebration. Known as the Festival of Light, Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem, freedom of worship and religion, and of course, the oil miraculously lasting 8 days when it was expected to last one. This year, continue your favorite Hanukkah traditions through a variety of virtual Hanukkah events and activities right from your home! Don't let this holiday season be any less exciting than the last. Hanukkah is meant to be celebrated, and thanks to the many virtual celebrations and activities listed below, this year will be just as exciting, tasty, and special as it has ever been before!  Festival: Virtual Israeli Cultural Evening and Chanukah Celebration December 10th, 2020; 8:00 PM to 9:30 PM EST Come join the Virtual Historic Tour of Hanukkah to not only celebrate this holiday season, but also to experience a virtual visit to Israel! Explore the rich history of Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Hebron, and Tel Aviv in a cultural and diverse Israeli-based evening. An expert tour guide will explain the origins of this joyous holiday, but it doesn't stop there! Take part in virtual Israeli cooking and wine demonstrations, with interactive and engaging musical and dance presentations from native performers. There will also be classic Hanukkah traditions and games for people of all ages to enjoy! Festival: Hanukkah - The Festival of Lights, Virtual Edition December 9th, 2020; 6:00 PM EST This Hanukkah, join The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and J Arts for a meaningful and exciting virtual celebration! There will be a variety of family-friendly programs and activities involving Hanukkah music, arts and crafts, Hanukkah stories, and digital Hanukkah animations. Honor the significant history and rich traditions through cultural music, dances, artist conversations, and a special community candle lighting ceremony. Film Festival: 8 Nights of Films for Hanukkah December 10th-17th, 2020; Time Varies for Different Events  To celebrate the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival's 40th anniversary, the Jewish Film Institute has organized a special and unique event, containing a drive-in movie and online screenings to honor the many decades of their history. Don't miss out on guests and remembrances relating to the Jewish cinema, with additional clips and trailers from the past 40 years. Join these 8 days of programming and have the opportunity to watch some well known Jewish classics such as “Film About A Father Who”, “Sublet”, and “Born in Jerusalem and Still Alive” to say a few. Make sure to light your candles, grab some latkes and sufganiyot, and enjoy a variety of films in honor of Hanukkah. Festival: Virtual Hanukkah Event December 11th-18th, 2020; Time Varies for Different Events  Let the JCC bring some added Hanukkah fun and excitement to you this holiday season! Creating beautiful crafts, taking a virtual photo gallery tour of unique Hanukiahs, and singing and dancing to a variety of Hanukkah music is only just the beginning of what this virtual event has to offer. Come hungry because you can find many new delicious recipes and view pre-recorded cooking demonstrations as well! Enjoy daily Maccabee Warrior intensive training with personal trainers, read nightly Hanukkah stories, and of course, don't miss out on virtual candle lighting ceremonies. You never know, maybe you’ll even discover new traditions to include in your future Hanukkah celebrations! Holiday: Hanukkah at Home - Virtual Worldwide Lighting December 22nd, 2020; 6:00 - 6:30 PM EST  Don't miss out on Lab/Shul Ritual Team for special Hanukkah inspired songs, stories, poetry, and more! Feel the joyous celebration as Rabbi Amichai and The Lab/Shul Team lead people of all ages and religions worldwide to light the symbolic holiday candles, illuminating so many houses around the world. Families with young children have an additional opportunity to join an 'Online Virtual Play Time' event. Here, join superstar kiddie rocker ShirLaLa, Lab/Shul Executive Director, Sarah Sokolic, and special guests of all ages including our favorite puppets! Holiday: Latkes & Light, A Virtual Family Hanukkah Celebration  December 13th, 2020; 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM EST  While people may not physically be together this Hanukkah, no one should ever be celebrating alone! Join the Jewish Community Center of Denver to light and bless the Hanukkah menorahs together, as one large community. This celebration is geared towards children ages 2-10, who will have the opportunity to sing, dance, and play Hanukkah themed activities. This event will feature educators from Jewish Explorers, Judaism Your Way, Staenberg-Loup Jewish Community Center, and PJ Library. Additionally, in honor of this celebration, The Tzedakah Project will benefit the JFS Weinberg Food Pantry, and there will be further discussions about the significance and impact that Tzedakah has on the world!  Festival: Holiday of Holidays December 10th-20th, 2020; Time Varies for Different Events  This Hanukkah, take part in the unique Holiday of Holidays Festival and contribute to promoting tolerance and mutual respect through culture and art! While exhibits are unfortunately unable to be physically displayed, join the online events showcasing art exhibitions and artist meetings, allowing one to be exposed to the beautiful array of culture and diversity within Israel. This festival provides the opportunity to take part in activities highlighting the positivity and benefits of developing relationships with other cultures. Learn the significance of breaking these unnecessary barriers, and develop or strengthen your trust between a variety of nationalities, ethnic groups, and religious groups throughout the Holy Land.  Festival: Hanukkah 2020 Gift December 10th-17th, 2020; Time Varies Based on Location Come and join eight international tour guides as they guide us on a virtual trip around the world! Explore Jewish geography, discover the captivating history, and even take a hot air balloon tour, all while meeting other Jewish participants in this exciting virtual opportunity!  Expand your Jewish community to people you never thought you would meet and connect with groups from Australia, Uganda, Turkey, Italy, Spain, and so much more. Give the gift of learning this Hanukkah season and get exposed to the significance and beauty of Jewish diversity all around the world.

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World Jewish Travel Official August 3, 2022

Celebrating Mimouna

Mimouna is a traditional North African Jewish celebration dinner, held annually the day after Passover and marking the return of the chametz. Though the tradition originated in North African countries like Morocco, cities around the world with a Maghrebi Jewish population now celebrate the holiday. In Morocco, on the afternoon of the last day of Passover, Jewish families prepare flour, honey, milk, and butter to be used to prepare post-Passover chametz celebration dinners. Historically, Jewish congregations would walk to an orchard in order to recite Birkat Ha'Ilanot, and following the conclusion of Passover, would recite passages from the Book of Proverbs and the Mishna. The celebration begins after nightfall on the last day of Passover. In many communities, non-Jewish neighbors sell chametz back to Jewish families as a beginning of the celebration. Moroccan and Algerian Jews throw open their homes to visitors, after setting out a lavish spread of traditional holiday cakes and sweetmeats. One of the holiday favorites is Mofletta. The table is also laid with various symbols of luck and fertility, with an emphasis on the number "5," such as five pieces of gold jewelry or five beans arranged on a leaf of pastry. The repetition of the number five references the five-fingered hamsa amulet common in both Jewish and Muslim North African and Middle Eastern communities from pre-modern times. Typically all those in attendance at a Mimouna celebration are sprinkled with a mint sprig or other green dipped in milk, symbolizing good fortune and new beginnings. Early in the day of the Mimouna, families go to the sea, splash water on their face, and walk barefoot in the water, to replay the scene of the miraculous crossing of the Reed Sea, which is believed to have taken place on the last day of Passover. In Israel, Mimouna has become a popular annual happening with private parties, outdoor gatherings, picnics and BBQs. One of the most notable Israeli celebrations takes place in Jerusalem’s Sacher Park, drawing about 100,000 people each year, often including the president and prime minister. Israeli law now requires employers to agree to grant an employee unpaid leave for Mimouna if asked. It has been estimated that in 2012 nearly two million people in Israel participated in Mimouna festivities. Other cities in Israel such as Tel Aviv and Ashdod are also known for their Mimouna celebrations as well. In Tel Aviv, many of the bars and clubs hold special events for Mimouna, and Ashdod is known for hosting former U.S. Ambassador to Israel, Dan Shapiro, at a Mimouna celebration in 2014. Ashkenazi Jews living in Israel will often seek out these public celebrations or join family's of Moroccan friends who hold large celebrations at home.

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HOTELS IN Tel Aviv

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#JEWISHTELAVIV

How much do you know about the ongoing story of the Jewish people?

The Tel Aviv based Museum of the Jewish People provides interactive exhibitions, educational programming, and acts as a center for Jewish discourse.

How can you learn more?
🔗 The link in our bio
🎙️ @thejerusalem_post travel podcast

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#Jewishhistorymusuem #jewishtravel #visittelaviv #jewishtelaviv #worldjewishtravel
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More than 4,000 zombies take the streets of Tel Aviv on the annual Tel Aviv Zombie Walk! 🧟

This march celebrates the Purim holiday where it is a common practice to dress up in costume.

While it is fun to just watch the march, we encourage you to get in costume and join as well. Tel Avivians go all out and say that the more bloody and nasty, the better!

Learn more about the Zombie walk through the link in our bio!

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#purim #zombiewalk #telaviv #jewishtelaviv #worldjewishtravel
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You MUST visit the Yemenite cuisine flooded neighborhood of Kerem HaTeimanim.

One of our favorite stops in the Tel Aviv neighborhood 👉 Melech Ha'Marak (King of Soup)!

The kitchen follows the legacy of its founder, Shimon, by serving warm and comforting soups throughout the day. 🥣

Visit the link in our bio to discover more of Tel Aviv!

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#telaviv #telavivfood #kerenhateimanim #jewishtelaviv #worldjewishtravel
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Rallies being held worldwide to gain justice for Sarah Halimi. Please join if you’re in any of these cities. If not, create one! #justiceforsarahhalimi #sarahhalimi #iamsarahhalimi #newyork #losangeles #nyc #la #miami #paris #marseille #telaviv #london #jewishnewyork #jewishlosangeles #jewishla #jewishmiami #jewishparis #parisjuif #juifparisienne #jewishmarseille #jewishtelaviv #jewishlondon ...

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